A Word From Stieg Larsson’s Translator

view from Kebnekaise, highest point in Sweden
view from Kebnekaise, highest point in Sweden

Steven T. Murray is not a household name, but he is the English to Swedish translator for Stieg Larsson, a title that comes with just a little bit of clout. According to his blog, which is titled Stieg Larsson’s English Translator, Steven is capable of translating from Swedish, Danish, Norwegian and German to English. Now that’s an impressive list of languages. I always tune into his blog every now and then to see what is going on in the literary world of northern Europe.

Recently, I found a particularly interesting item posted by Steven, telling of a recent vampire novel that he had just put into English from Swedish. Now, I’m about the last person world to get interested in a vampire reading. I think I once read 50 pages of Anne Rice’s “Interview With a Vampire” and have yet to watch any vampire movies, unless you consider The Rocky Horror Picture Show to be one of that genre.

However, Murray’s most recent blog caught my attention so here’s the gist of it. Steven has just finished the translation from Swedish to English of a novel called “Nephilim”, by Asa Schwarz. The storyline is kind of humorous and very entertaining all at the same time. According to Steven, the plot goes like this: “these fallen angels, one of whom stowed away on Noah’s Ark when God was trying to wipe them out with the Flood, then interbred with humans and created a new race that has survived to the present day.” I hope that’s not enough words to count as plagiarism, but you had read the whole post at this link.

And while you’re at it here are a couple of more pictures of Sweden, courtesy of Wikipedia.

The Sweden to Denmark Öresunds bridge, Jonas Ericsson, courtesy of Wikipedia
The Sweden to Denmark Öresunds bridge, by Jonas Ericsson, courtesy of Wikipedia
Swedish palace by Kim Hansen, courtesy of Wikipedia
Swedish palace by Kim Hansen, courtesy of Wikipedia

P.S. The book is due to be published in Australia and the UK in 2011 by Sibling Press.

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