Advice from the Good Doctor

Are You a Fan of the Cat in the Hat????

The Cat in the Hat visits Las Vegas, Nevada
The Cat in the Hat visits Las Vegas, Nevada

Remembering Those Children’s Book

You might say I grew up in the “golden age” of children’s books, the fifties. This was a time when you go to your elementary school library and choose from a wide array of current or time-tested titles. Our particular book lending venue in small town Maryland was well-stocked with popular titles, such as The Cat In the Hat, The Little Engine That Could, Little Black Sambo, Babar the Elephant and the Tales of Peter Rabbit. I have to admit my favorite was “Curious George”, but high on the list was the Cat In the Hat and Green Eggs and Ham by the notorious Dr. Seuss. Following is some general info and ever-so-timely advice from the man who went by the nom de plume of Doctor Seuss.

Will the Real Dr. Seuss Please Stand Up?

Dr. Seuss was the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel, who was born in 1904 and died in 1991 at age 87. Before settling on Dr. Seuss, Geisel wrote under the pen names of Dr. Theophrastus Seuss, Theo LeSieg and Rosetta Stone. Theodor, a product of German immigrants, was born and raised in Springfield, Massachusetts and attended nearby Dartmouth College in New Hampshire.

Strangely enough, Theodor first used his Seuss pen name after he and nine companions were busted for drinking gin in a dorm room at Dartmouth College. This event occurred during the Prohibition era. So in order to avoid being banned from the campus newspaper, of which he was an integral part, Theodor Geisel began using a variation of his middle name to get around the college authorities. After Dartmouth, Seuss attended Lincoln College in England with hopes of obtaining a P.H.D. in English Literature. In 1927, Theodor Geisel dropped out of Lincoln College to begin a job in the U.S. creating political cartoons.  In 1937 Dr. Seuss published his book, And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street. The rest is history.

Advice for Writers (and others)

1. ” Don’t cry because it’s over. Smile because it happened.”

2. “It’s a troublesome world. All the people who’re in it are troubled with troubles every minute. You ought to be thankful, a whole heaping lot, for the places and people you’re lucky you’re not.”

3. ” I meant what I said and I said what I meant.”

4. “Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple.”

5. “I’m sorry to say
so but, sadly it’s true
that bang-ups and hang-ups
can happen to you.”

6. “Adults are just obsolete children and the hell with them.”

7. “Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh, the things you can think up if only you try.”

8. “Fun is good.”

9. “I am a zizzer zazzer zuzz as you can plainly see.”

10. “Preachers in pulpits talked about what a great message is in the book. No matter what you do, somebody always imputes meaning into your books.”

The cat in the hat shares some thoughts on aging
This “Cat In The Hat” spoof shares some thoughts on aging

At Last

And finally don’t forget that March 2 – Dr. Seuss’s birthday – is Read Across America Day.

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