Amazon’s Advantage

The tortoise and the Hare from the Gutenberg Project via Wikipedia
The tortoise and the Hare from the Gutenberg Project via Wikipedia. Who the tortoise is and who the hare represents in this ongoing conflict depends largely on point of view.

Life On Normal Street

Recently, I had the pleasant opportunity of viewing one of Amazon Studio’s new releases, Gortimer Gibbon’s Life on Normal Street. It was an enjoying half-hour program about three kids finding their own adventure on an unusually hot summer day. The first of this kid’s series was done very well. The Main Street setting and the liberal use of magic realism reminded me of some of Ray Bradbury tales from his childhood in Waukegan, Illinois. Created by¬†David Anaxagoras, this story came to Amazon Studios by open submission.

Amazon Diversifies

Amazon Studios is Amazon’s answer to Netflix. The above-mentioned, Gortimer Gibbon’s Life on Normal Street, is just the first in a line of TV pilots and movies from Amazon Studios that can be downloaded and watched on various electronic devices, ranging from a Smartphone to a large flat screen TV. These programs usually cost to view, but some pilots can be watched free of charge by the general public, as was the case with the first episode of Gortimer Gibbons. The point here, is that Amazon is a company that seems willing and capable of expanding its creative efforts. And in the case of Amazon Studios, they are more than willing to deal directly with writers in developing visual content.

Hachette and Simon & Schuster 

Though these two Big Five publishers appear to have received the better part of their deal with Amazon. However, they, along with other large-scale publishers, may face an uncertain future with the paperback bestseller. The high-priced e-book deal these companies cut with Amazon is designed to aid the sale of paperbacks. I don’t know of anybody that believes e-books will replace the paperback, but they will take a larger slice of the pie in the upcoming years. Just how big this slice will be could depend on how well each party plays its own hand.

Parent Companies

Strangely enough, the biggest problem for these publishers may be their parent companies, who may demand maximum profits at the expense of literary quality, fair royalties for writers and incentives to diversify. The Big Five may not be doomed as some the new Kindle millionaires may suggest, but they certainly do face a challenging future.

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