Take A Deep Breath

Zion_angels_landing_view (1) small
Zion Canyon at sunset in Zion National Park as seen from Angels Landing looking south. from Wikipedia, photo by Diliff

Not The Tragedy That I First Thought It Was

Yesterday, I had a moment of sad regrets that left my mind racing and me pounding the table with my fist. No…… noboby died, I didn’t lose my job nor did I get evicted and be forced to move into a homeless shelter. The cold hard truth is that my laptop computer died.

Immediately, I started thinking how I could replace the invaluable electronic device with a new updated model complete with all the latest bells and whistles. In fact, this has been a move that I have been contemplating for quite some time. Only lack of funds and an old outdated Gateway that refused to die kept me using by old faithful friend.

Rider by H. Koppdelaney
Rider by H. Koppdelaney

Things Look Different This Morning

Today, the urge to buy a new internet device is not so much an overwhelming event, as it was yesterday. I had originally planned to make the purchase next month after I move. This morning that  still seems like a good idea. The damage to the computer is not fatal and my hard drive is probably OK. I have power to the laptop, but  the screen is black. Other more impressing problems like doing my laundry and going grocery shopping have arisen and taken the place of the computer with the black screen.

Chance Upon A Good Read

After my computer went down, I was lost as what to do, especially since there is limited TV reception out here in the wilds of Northern New Mexico. By chance I came upon a good read, titled The Snow Lion’s Turquoise Mane. The collection of very short stories is subtitled, Wisdom Tales from Tibet, and the text is written by Surya Das, a well known Buddhist teacher, who is referred to by the Dalai Lama, as the “American Lama” . So I guess I can say, all is not lost.

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First Snow Hits Santa Fe

First Snow In Santa Fe
These sculptures on Canyon Road in Santa Fe receive a small dusting from the snow that fell last Saturday night, photo by author

Warm Autumn

The unusually warm autumn temperatures that we have been experiencing in the nation’s highest state capitol abruptly came to an end last weekend, when temperatures took a big plunge and little white flakes of frozen precipitation came floating down from the sky. The snow soon melted, but early birds, who were up and about on Sunday were witnesses to a visual treat – a dusting of snow.

light snow in Santa Fe
Light snow and cold temperatures make for bas relief images all across town, photo by author

Bas Relief

The cold crisp mountain air combined with early morning lighting conditions created ideal conditions for creating photographic images that looked with bas relief prints. Here, dry powdery snow on top of a blacktop parking lot created these striking results.

Graphic design in the snow
A dusting of snow had an intriguing effect to these words that were applied to the road surface with white paint, photo by author

Wintertime Graphic Design

The snowfall created strange visual effects to letters and words painted to the asphalt road surfaces.

abstract art in the snow
This manhole cover takes on a whole new appearance after the overnight snow fall, photo by author

Abstract Art In the Snow

Many of the NY abstract painters of the post war (WWII) era, enjoyed working in black and white and shades of gray that fell in between. This snowfall gave me a chance to make an image that resembled an early Pousette-Dart painting.

Sculpture on Canyon Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico
This cool cat is one of the many sculptures that can be found along Canyon Road in Santa Fe, New Mexico

On Canyon Road

Santa Fe is one of those scenic western towns that has seen an explosion of art galleries within its city limits and much of this displayed art can be found on the trendy Canyon Road.. Canyon Road is a long winding narrow lane that is filled numerous art galleries and studio spaces. The outdoor sculpture made for an interesting artistic element amidst the freshly fallen snow.

A Tale of Two Cities

66 Diner on Old Route 66 in Albuquerque
66 Diner on Old Route 66 in Albuquerque

Albuquerque

Albuquerque is the southernmost of the two cities and with a population of nearly half-a-million, it is the largest city in New Mexico. The University of New Mexico is located here along with Sandia Labs, Kirtland Air Force Base and Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute. The city is noted for its location on the original Camino Real (Royal Road) that ran all the way into Mexico and old Route 66, which passed through the city on its East-to-West path. Even today, some of the Art Deco highway architecture can still found within the city limits. Currently the new NM Railrunner passes through the city on route from Santa Fe to the southernmost point.

Poster of ongoing art show on display on the exterior of the New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe.

Santa Fe

About 50 miles to the north of Albuquerque at an elevation of 5,000 feet, sits the state  capitol of New Mexico, Santa Fe. Once this frontier outpost was the western terminus of the Santa Fe Trail start began in Independence, Missouri and crossed the Kansas prairie to northern New Mexico. Once trade routes were established with the US, merchants here were able to do business with both the US and Mexico and as a result the town flourished. Much of that heritage can be seen today among the numerous trading posts, restaurants, stores and inns that abound in this high altitude city of only 70,000 residents. Despite its small size, Santa Fe is a busy business hub that sees much commerce and trade.

Nm Railrunner Emblem
A bold image of the roadrunner marks the NM Railrunner train.

The Rail Runner 

Linking Santa Fe and Albuquerque by cheap rail has done many things for both cities. The rail cost between 300 and 400 million dollars and was first opened in 2006 with a run between Albuquerque and Belem to the south. In 2008 the train began servicing Santa Fe, so nowadays almost 300,000 one way passes are used every month. Price of a roundtrip same-day ticket are just under $10 dollars, while a one way is only a little bit less.

The railrunner has a been boon to tourism because of the ease of access between the two cities. Also it has created work commuters, who can ride the rails and save fuel and wear and tear on the vehicles. The number of daily riders has risen each year, yet the rail still falls 10 million short on being self-sufficient every year. Considering the rail line between Albuquerque and Santa Fe is less than five-years old, the overall outlook of the rail service is bright and encouraging for other places that might want to consider setting up rail connections between closely located cities. It should be noted that this is not a high-speed service as maximum speed is somewhere around highway speed.

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