Veterans Day In America

This Veteran’s Day sign was blown down by the wind, photo by author

Veteran’s Day In America

This year Veteran’s Day falls on a Sunday. This is a good deal for Vets, for some businesses (such as restaurants) that offer free services – or gifts – on Veteran’s Day, may wait until Monday, while others will observe the 11th as the true holiday. Either way active and inactive servicemen can enjoy the best of both worlds and enjoy a free meal – or whatever – on two days instead of one. No matter what you choose to do on this national holiday, thanks for serving the country. Special thoughts go out to those who have risked (and sometimes lost) their lives in foreign conflicts. Today, we still have Afghanistan ongoing as a military conflict, while Iraq, which claimed over 4,000 American lives, has been complete and silent  for almost a year. Hopefully, no new military venture surfaces in the near future, but the world is a dangerous place, so no telling what may happen.

Solemn Reminder

And here is a solemn reminder – in the form of a color photograph – about how much grief and sadness a long war can bring down upon a nation. The picture is of a replica of the  Washington Vietnam War Memorial, as it was displayed at Old Orchard Beach on Memorial Day, maybe ten years ago. The shadows and reflections were only partially visualized at the time the picture was shot, but they definitely give the photograph an eerie quality.

A replica of the Vietnam Wall Memorial
A replica of the Vietnam Wall Memorial on display in Old Orchard Beach, Maine at Memorial Day, photo by author
Advertisements

Writing About War

Ruins at Guernica in 1937
Ruins at Guernica in 1937 photo from Deutsches Bundesarchiv (German Federal Archive)

Oops, I let Veterans Day slide by without posting anything about the date of observance, so here are a few belated thoughts about novelists who write from the war experience. Actually the list is quite long, for it seems that participating in a prolonged military engagement provides good material, not to mention some real-life experience for novelists and other types of creative writers. I’ll skip the great Russian writers – you know the titles – War and Peace or Doctor Zhivago and jump to the American scene.

Actually the American Civil War was not only one of the bloodiest of all wars, but also one of the most written about. Besides such notable stories as the “Red Badge of Courage” by Stephen Crane and the “Occurrence At Owl Creek Bridge”, by Ambrose Bierce there are over a thousand first-person accounts of the war that were published in book form. Just reading a synopsis of one of these accounts is fascinating, but the going for the whole book might be even better.

Fast forward to the Second War World, which provided firsthand material for a number of successful writers. Take for example Norman Mailer and his “The Naked and the Dead” or James Michener’s “Tales of the South Pacific”, “Slaughterhouse Five” by Kurt Vonnegut or “Mister Roberts” by Thomas O. Heggen. All of these are stories well told that usually brought the writer some literary fame and financial compensation.  Even Jack Kerouac served in WWII with the merchant marines. He too, wrote a story about the adventure which has just recently been published. It is entitled “The Sea Is My Brother”. Not one of his most noteworthy titles, but it goes to show how widely the war experience runs.

Nazi-parading-in-elysian-fields-paris-desert-1940
Nazi-parading-in-elysian-fields-paris 1940 Public Domain (U.S. War Department

Good writing during wartime did not stop during Vietnam with quite a few films and books having been released and still available to readers as paperbacks or DVD’s. My favorite Vietnam War book, “The Things They Carried With Them by Tim O’Brien and Full Metal Jacket, the Stanley Kubrick movie.

I hope this post doesn’t sound like I’m glorifying war, but it is hard to imagine what some of these writers would have done if they hadn’t gone to war.